23,000 Lbs of Bologna Recalled for E. Coli

Palmyra Bologna Company, Inc., of Palmyra, Pennsylvania, is recalling approximately 23,000 pounds of Lebanon bologna products that may be contaminated with <"http://www.yourlawyer.com/practice_areas/food_poisoning">E. coli O157:H7, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) just announced. Lebanon bologna is a fermented, semi-dry sausage that has an appearance similar to salami.

This recall is a Class I, which means this represents a health hazard situation in which there is a reasonable probability that the use of the defective product will cause serious, adverse health consequences or death.

Recalled consumer products involved are listed below. Each package bears a label with establishment number “EST. 474″ inside the USDA mark of inspection, in addition to lot code “01351” and the best-by date noted. The products subject to recall were produced in December 2010 and were sent to distribution centers in California, Colorado, Maryland, New York, and Pennsylvania for further distribution to retail stores:

• 6-ounce packages of “SELTZER’S BEEF LEBANON BOLOGNA” with lot code “01351” and best-by date of “Apr. 20 2011″ printed on the package.

• 12-ounce packages of “SELTZER’S BEEF LEBANON BOLOGNA” with lot code “01351” and best-by dates of “Apr. 20 2011″ or “Apr. 21 2011″ printed on the package.

• 16-ounce packages of “SELTZER’S BEEF LEBANON BOLOGNA” with lot code “01351” and best-by date of “Apr. 22 2011″ printed on the package.

Recalled retail products involved are listed below. Each package bears a label with establishment number “EST. 474″ inside the USDA mark of inspection, in addition to either lot code “06337” or “01351.” The recalled bologna was sold to retailers and may have been further sliced and repackaged at retail. The products subject to recall were produced in December 2010 and were sent to distribution centers in California, Colorado, Maryland, New York, and Pennsylvania for further distribution to retail stores:

• Whole chub packages of “SELTZER’S BEEF LEBANON BOLOGNA” with lot codes “01351” or “06337” and best-by date of “Feb. 14 2011,” “Feb. 15 2011,” “Feb. 16 2011,” or “Feb. 28 2011″ printed on the package.

• Half chub packages of “SELTZER’S BEEF LEBANON BOLOGNA” with lot codes “01351” or “06337” and best-by date of “Apr. 6 2011,” “Apr. 7 2011,” “Apr. 16 2011,” or “Apr. 19 2011,” printed on the package.

• 12-pound bulk boxes of sliced “SELTZER’S BEEF LEBANON BOLOGNA” with lot code “01351” and best-by date of “Apr. 21 2011″ printed on the package.

When available, the retail distribution list(s) will be posted on FSIS’ website at www.fsis.usda.gov/FSIS_Recalls/ Open_Federal_Cases/index.asp.

FSIS was notified of an investigation of E. coli O157:H7 illnesses on March 10, 2011. Working in conjunction with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and state public health partners, four case-patients in New Jersey, North Carolina, and Pennsylvania have been identified with illness onset dates between January 28, 2011 and February 12, 2011. As a result of the epidemiologic investigation, FSIS revealed a link between the Lebanon bologna products and the illnesses in these states. FSIS is working with the CDC, affected state public health partners, and the company on the investigation.

E. coli symptoms include bloody diarrhea, dehydration, abdominal cramps, and vomiting. In the most severe cases, kidney failure can occur. The very young, seniors, and persons with weak immune systems are the most susceptible. E. coli infection can lead to other adverse health effects, some long-term and serious, such as Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) and a form of reactive arthritis called Reiter’s Syndrome. Some victims require kidney transplants and may have scarred intestines that cause lasting digestive difficulty and some E. coli patients who supposedly recovered, can experience long-term health problems; about 10 percent of E. coli sufferers develop a life-threatening complication called hemolytic uremic syndrome, or HUS, in which kidneys and other organs fail.

The firm can be reached, toll-free, at 1-800-282-6336. Consumers with food safety questions can “Ask Karen,” the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov. The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from l0 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day.

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