BPA May Impact Female Fertility

<"http://www.yourlawyer.com/practice_areas/toxic_substances">Bisphenol a—BPA—the ubiquitous, estrogenic polycarbonate plastic, has, for the first time, been linked to female fertility issues, according to Science Daily.

Hundreds of studies have linked BPA to cardiovascular disease, intestinal problems, brain cell connection interference, increased risks of reproductive and immune system diseases and disorders, problems with liver function testing, interruptions in chemotherapy, premature puberty, polycystic ovarian syndrome, and erectile dysfunction and male sexual problems. BPA is also found in the bodies of 93 percent of Americans and 90 percent of American newborns. A recent study on which we just wrote revealed that human exposure to the ubiquitous estrogenic polycarbonate chemical is significantly higher than previously believed and also originates from a greater array of sources, many of which remain unknown.

We also recently wrote that another study determined that BPA easily passes through the skin into the body. An issue of significant concern since, as we’ve previously written, BPA is present in a large majority of cash register receipts.

The recent study, conducted at the University of California, San Francisco, was the first to locate evidence in humans that BPA exposure might adversely affect the egg quality in those eggs that are retrieved for in vitro fertilization (IVF), said Science Daily. The study found that as BPA blood levels doubled, the percentage of eggs that fertilized fell by 50 percent, according to the research, said Science Daily.

“While preliminary, the data indicate the negative effect of BPA on reproductive health and the importance of allocating more funding to further investigate why such environmental contaminants might be disrupting fertility potential,” said Victor Y. Fujimoto, MD, lead study author and professor in the UCSF Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, who also is on the faculty of the UCSF Center for Reproductive Health, quoted Science Daily. Findings appear online in the journal Fertility and Sterility.

BPA levels and fertilization rates were analyzed for 26 women who were undergoing IVF in 2007-2008 at UCSF’s Center for Reproductive Health, said Science Daily. These women were part of a larger study that was looking at reproductive health and trace exposures to toxic metals such as mercury, cadmium, and lead, added Science Daily.

“Given the widespread nature of BPA exposure in the U.S., even a modest effect on reproduction is of substantial concern,” said Michael S. Bloom, PhD, senior author and an assistant professor in the departments of Environmental Health Sciences, and Epidemiology and Biostatistics at the School of Public Health of the University at Albany, State University of New York, quoted Science Daily.

Of note, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found BPA in the urine of most everyone tested in a 2004 analysis of the U.S. population, said Science Daily. As we’ve previously written, BPA is found in the bodies of 93 percent of Americans and 90 percent of American newborns and a recent study revealed that human exposure to BPA is significantly higher than previously believed and also originates from a greater array of sources, many of which continue to remain unknown.

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