Ethan Allen Recalls Roman Shades

Ethan Allen Global Inc., of Danbury, Connecticut, has issued a large recall of about 163,000 <"http://www.yourlawyer.com/practice_areas/product_liability">Roman Shades, adding its name to the retailers joining the voluntary recall announced December 2009, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) just announced.

Although no incidents or injuries have been reported, the recall has been initiated because strangulation can occur when a child places his/her neck between the exposed inner cord and the fabric on the backside of the shade, or when a child pulls the cord out and wraps it around his/her neck. Also, strangulation can occur when a child’s neck become entangled on the freestanding loop.

This recall involves all styles and sizes of Roman Shades sold under the Ethan Allen brand name. These custom-ordered, made-to-order shades were sold in a variety of colors, fabrics, and sizes and have no labels or markings making reference to the Ethan Allen brand. Manufactured in the United States, the recalled Roman Shades were sold at Ethan Allen Design Centers since at least 1999 through December 2009. Most are priced between $400 and $1,000.

The CPSC is advising consumers to stop using the recalled Ethan Allen Roman Shades immediately and contact their local Ethan Allen Design Center for a free repair kit. Ethan Allen can be reached toll-free at 1-888-339-9398 between 8:30 a.m. and 4:45 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday; at a local Ethan Allen Design Center; or at the firm’s Web site at www.ethanallen.com

In recent months, a variety of firms have been recalling Roman shades and roll-up blinds over the risk of strangulation risks to children. The December 2009 recall was issued jointly by the CPSC and the Window Covering Safety Council (WCSC) and was one of the largest product recalls in United States history, involving some 50 million Roman shades and roll-up blinds—every such blind on the market.

As we have previously written, according to the CPSC, Roman shades have been implicated in the deaths of five children and 16 near strangulations since 2006. Roll-up blinds have been cited in three strangulation deaths since 2001.

Strangulations in Roman shades can occur when a child places his/her neck between the exposed inner cord and the fabric on the backside of the blind or when a child pulls the cord out and wraps it around his/her neck, the agency said. Strangulations in roll-up blinds can occur if the lifting loop slides off the side of the blind and a child’s neck becomes entangled on the free-standing loop or if a child places his/her neck between the lifting loop and the roll-up blind material.

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